City of Golden Zoning Code Update

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As we enter into our engagement efforts in the Zoning Code rewrite process this September, three different neighborhood meetings are planned for September 8, 20, and 23, each hosted at the Golden Community Center from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. The purpose of these meetings is to present the new Form Zone overlay districts that have been mapped to the zone districts identified below. Staff will be on hand to explain the methodology used to apply these maps, and gather feedback.

September 8: R1 and R2 zoned neighborhoods north of Highway 58

September 20: R3, C1, and C2 neighborhoods directly south of Highway 58 (this includes the 8th and 9th Street and 12th Street neighborhoods and downtown properties)

September 23: Central Neighborhoods (CMU, R1, and R2) south of downtown along the Ford and Jackson Street corridors. This includes the East Street Neighborhood.

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If you are unable to attend the meeting in your neighborhood, we still want to hear from you! Please take a moment to fill out the survey on the guiding golden page linked below. The survey for each meeting will go live at the beginning of each week that a meeting is scheduled. Thanks!

The second draft of the updated zoning code is now available for review! Please reference the Zoning Code Draft Sections tabs at the side of this page for the updated version of the Zoning Code components. In addition, there is a summary of the changes provided below in the "Summary of Updates" section and also in a downloadable pdf document. We also want to share some important information about the draft, outreach, and schedule moving forward.

The second draft incorporates several additions, corrections, and adjustments from our initial discussion with City Council and Planning Commission. The summary of these changes are provided in the sections below. A survey is available to gather specific feedback on considerations to be discussed in our next conversation with City Council and Planning Commission. We welcome the public’s opinion in this matter. You can find the survey below.

Development Moratorium

On July 13th, 2021, Council approved a revised Ordinance 2165, which establishes a temporary (180 day) moratorium that impacts the R1, R1A, R2 and R3 zone districts. The purpose of the moratorium is to allow the City to finalize the zoning code rewrite and conduct the public process that leads to formal adoption by City Council, which is targeted to occur by the end of 2021. The zoning code rewrite is intended to address the scale of development and better ensure that structures are appropriate for the neighborhood context. The moratorium prevents any new dwelling unit structures or the expansion of existing dwelling unit structures during this time period, which impacts single family, accessory dwelling units, duplex and multifamily structures during the 180 time period in the above mentioned zone districts. The moratorium does not impact non-household structures such as sheds, detached garages, fences, pergolas, decks and similar structures.

Timeline to Code Adoption and End of Moratorium

  • July 20: City Council Study Session on 2nd Draft
  • August/September: Final draft and legal review of Title 17 and 18 code changes
  • September: Neighborhood open house meeting to finalize zoning code map
  • October through December: Zoning code adoption process (Planning Commission and City Council)

Code Test Simulations Now Available

CORE - R2 Simulation Test

NEIGHBORHOOD CORRIDOR - Simulation Test

CORE / TRANSITION - R3 (Preservation) - Simulation Test

Three testing simulations are now available for public reference. The purpose of these testing documents is to provide comparisons between potential development scenarios in different context areas where the new code will be applied. The testing examples provide an accurate and complete comparison between the existing code and the draft code. Several different scenarios are provided within each simulation test as well as descriptive explanations.

Consistent with the Diagnostic Report, the new code aims to address the following, identified issues more appropriately than the existing code.

  • Incompatible setbacks and bulk plane –The current bulk plane regulation doesn’t go far enough to help regenerate common forms found within the neighborhood. The new code offers additional controls to assist with this idea.
  • Scale and size of new buildings – “The larger the lot, the larger the building” is a rule of thumb that is unfortunately associated with our current code. The new code counteracts this permission by placing a cap on the overall size of the structure.
  • Size of the lot – the original zoning ordinance (1949) only required 4,500 square feet minimum lot sizes of single-family homes. It wasn’t until 1960 that this number increased to 7,000 square feet. The new code reintroduces these smaller lot sizes as a means of reconfiguring large, multi-family buildings into a new multi-family development type that incorporates a series of smaller, detached structures. This will help recreate this older form of development when new development occurs.


City Council Study Session

Once we’ve all had time to digest the code, City Council will review comments and findings on July 20. This will be the opportunity for Planning Commission and City Council to provide staff with further direction. You may attend the meeting in person in Council Chambers (911 10th Street) on July 20 at 6:30 p.m. (please note: this is a study session, so there will be no opportunity for public comment at this particular meeting) or watch the meeting at GCO.tv or www.cityofgolden.net/agendas.

A lead in presentation can be viewed below. This presentation discusses the "Core" simulation above and talks about the 2nd Draft's updates.

2nd Draft Presentation

Mapping Process and Future Outreach

The draft zoning code can only take effect once the form zones are mapped to the city and the new zoning map is adopted by City Council. Beginning in the fall, staff will be engaging with the community at the neighborhood level to discuss how to apply the form zones across each neighborhood. We plan to meet with following neighborhoods initially:

  1. North Neighborhoods (properties north of Highway 58)
  2. Downtown Residents (8th / 9th Street Neighborhoods & 12th Street Neighborhood)
  3. Central Neighborhoods (East Street & CMU Neighborhoods along Jackson and Ford Street Corridors)
  4. Future Meetings for the South Neighborhoods will be determined after this first round

Summary of Updates

Building Form Zones & Adjustments

The modifications made to the form zones for Draft 2 consists of a variety of elements ranging from the exclusion of various form types in certain areas to minor adjustments made to the boundaries of the form zones themselves.

Urban Duplex

First and foremost, the Urban Duplex and Compact Urban Duplex have been removed from the Transition form zone based on feedback received from the public as well as City Council. These form types are still permitted under the Edge, Urban Edge, Main Street, and Strip form zones as they represent the highest density form zones across the city. Further consideration will be given to these form types when we enter the mapping phase of the code rewrite. (Section 18.29.100 under Form Zones & Building Form Types provides a description of each form zone and the form types permitted within.)

Peripheral / R1 & R1A Use Zones

Another large scale change related to the form zones is oriented around the R1 zone districts: R1 and R1A. The Peripheral form zone that includes the R1 zone districts now only permits a limited number of form types (3), which are all single household unit types. These include the Suburban House form type with its side-drive variant and the Village House form type that accommodates alley-loaded properties. It should be emphasized that these form types will not permit small lot subdivision, and the minimum lot sizes required for each will be consistent with what is permitted in the code today. However, the total size of the overall development will be capped at 3,200 above grade finished square feet (Suburban House type). However, this 3,200 square foot cap would not include finished basements, garages, attics, or other unconditioned accessory buildings. ADUs, on the other hand, are included in the total. (Section 18.29.107, page 13 under Form Zones & Building Form Types describes the Peripheral)

RE Use Zone

The RE zone district has been removed from the rezoning effort entirely. It shall be subject to existing zoning standards moving forward, as there are no current form types that would address the lower height limit and larger setbacks found in this zone district. We are testing in our survey whether to add a maximum square footage limitation for future RE developments. We are considering limiting the total square footage for a new development to 3,200 square feet. This total would NOT include finished basements and unconditioned spaces like garages. It would be limited to above-ground conditioned space and ADUs if applicable. Please see survey below.

Map Adjustments

Finally, the form zone map has been updated based on feedback received during the first public outreach phase. This is not the final map, just a placeholder until the individual neighborhood engagement meetings occur and more specific input is received. These current modifications include the following areas:

  1. The half block near the intersection of 9th and Arapahoe has been adjusted to Transition.
  2. The north block of 9th street between Maple Street and Illinois Street has been adjusted to Core.
  3. Commercial properties in the West Downtown neighborhood between Miner’s Alley and Arapahoe Street have been adjusted to Main Street A.
  4. The Jackson Street corridor between 15th Street and 20th Street has been adjusted to Main Street B.
  5. All RE zoned properties have been removed from the zoning overlay map.

Building Form Types

The Form Types in the proposed code draft have largely remained unchanged aside from some significant adjustments related to parking, dwelling unit clarifications, and preservation.

New Form Types

As mentioned, most of the changes related to the form types involved removing certain form types from particular contexts across the city. With that said, there are two new form types we are adding to the code to assist with the development of residential structures on steep slopes. These are titled the Uphill House and the Uphill Duplex. These form types permit a direct access scenario directly from the frontage street to a garage position near the front setback of the lot. This accommodation was made with the understanding that it is very difficult to develop elements of a residence towards the rear of the lot where steep slopes are present on these properties. (p.37 and p.68 under Form Zones & Building Form Types)

Number of Dwellings / ADUs

In addition to these changes, we have updated several of the residential form types to indicate the number of dwelling units permitted and clearly indicated whether a form type allows for the development of an accessory dwelling unit.

(All House, Cottage, Compound, Cluster, Duplex, Row House, and Apartment building form types, except for the Four-Story Courtyard Apartment building form types have been adjusted accordingly under Form Zones & Building Form Types.)

Parking

Per the feedback we received from both the community and City Council, commercial uses will now reference the existing commercial parking standards housed in Chapter 18.36 of the new code. Each form type permitted in both a residential and/or commercial area of the city now has a residential standard as well as the reference to 18.36 for commercial uses. These updates have been made to the form zone sheets directly.

Preservation

The proposed form-based code offers the unique opportunity to enhance preservation across the City. One example of its approach is the ability to preserve an existing small structure on a lot but permit the construction of a second similar structure on the same property. The existing code makes this scenario impossible and promotes scraping and redevelopment – most recently in the form of large-scale duplexes.

In an effort to make preservation of existing home even more attractive, the code draft has been revised to permit more flexibility if a property owner wishes to expand an existing home.

Mostly Preserved Structure

The revised code draft introduces a process to establish a “Mostly Preserved Structure.” In this scenario, if 75% or more of an existing structure is preserved, the setback and building heights in the middle/rear of the lot are relaxed to allow the property owner to more easily add an addition. This process is identified as the “mostly preserved structure” process. For properties located in the historic districts, it shall be the role of Historic Preservation Board to grant a development a "Mostly Preserved Structure" status. However, this process will be available for structures outside the historic districts, and in this scenario, the planning division will confirm that 75% of the structure is being preserved prior to initiating a review for site development. Notes allowing for this accommodation have been added to the Side-Drive House, Village House, Cottage, Side-Drive Cottage and Duplex building form types. (See definition for "Mostly Preserved Structure" page 30 in 18.29.210 Form Zones and Building Form Types)

Building Form and Development Review

The proposed zoning draft outlines a process discussed with City Council and Planning Commission that will make all development proposals available to the public to review for a set amount of time after the planning division staff has made a determination to approve or deny a submission.

Calling Up an Application

Once an application to develop a form type has been reviewed administratively by staff, staff will create a report and analysis of the application materials and post it to Guiding Golden in its entirety for the community to review and ask questions. This review period will last for 15 days from the date posted. If any code requirements are observed by the public to have not been met within this review period of staff’s decision (with reference to the approval criteria for an application), and If City Council feels that the code deficiencies observed by the public are warranted, Council shall have the right to “call up” an application to be reviewed by the Planning Commission. (Section 18.29.400 page 108 in Form Zones and Building Form Types)

Landscaping & Site Development Standards

The new Landscaping and Site Development Regulations section has been updated to incorporate water conscious standards into our regulations moving forward.

Xeric Landscaping

The proposed draft of the code now requires at least 50% of the selected plant materials to come from recommended xeric plant materials lists. In addition, water conscious irrigation systems are now required. Additional guidelines have been implemented to encourage water-conscious practices with new developments. (Chapter 18.40)

Sidewalk Standards

The sidewalk standards from the existing code have been relocated to this section.(Chapter 18.40 page 2)

Shed Standards

Accommodations for accessory structures such as utility sheds have been added to the document. (Chapter 18.40 page 12)


The digital version of the form zone map makes it easy search the map for property addresses and see what form zone your property is in.


Don't Zone Out, Zone In!

Simply put, our zoning code is old… really old! It was developed over 50 years ago and although it’s been built upon and adjusted over the years, it’s not enough. The foundation of the code was based on an era long gone and those development preferences don’t represent the Golden community of today. Our decisions as a city are rooted in Golden Vision 2030, a document that is based off the vision, values, and needs expressed to us by you, our Golden community. We believe the Zoning Code should reflect those same modern beliefs.

So here we are, with a draft of the Zoning Code Rewrite based on a lot of research, work and insight from our consultants and community members who know the ins and outs of zoning. But they’re not the only ones affected by a rewrite. The truth is, anyone who works or lives in the City is impacted by pieces of the zoning code every day. That’s why it’s important to get your thoughts and feedback on this draft before we move forward. On Jan. 28, 2021 the Zoning Code Rewrite draft was unveiled at a virtual community meeting. You will find that draft and a video of the meeting right here.

Still can’t find what you need? Contact Cory Miller – cmiller@cityofgolden.net

As we enter into our engagement efforts in the Zoning Code rewrite process this September, three different neighborhood meetings are planned for September 8, 20, and 23, each hosted at the Golden Community Center from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. The purpose of these meetings is to present the new Form Zone overlay districts that have been mapped to the zone districts identified below. Staff will be on hand to explain the methodology used to apply these maps, and gather feedback.

September 8: R1 and R2 zoned neighborhoods north of Highway 58

September 20: R3, C1, and C2 neighborhoods directly south of Highway 58 (this includes the 8th and 9th Street and 12th Street neighborhoods and downtown properties)

September 23: Central Neighborhoods (CMU, R1, and R2) south of downtown along the Ford and Jackson Street corridors. This includes the East Street Neighborhood.

-----------------------------------------

If you are unable to attend the meeting in your neighborhood, we still want to hear from you! Please take a moment to fill out the survey on the guiding golden page linked below. The survey for each meeting will go live at the beginning of each week that a meeting is scheduled. Thanks!

The second draft of the updated zoning code is now available for review! Please reference the Zoning Code Draft Sections tabs at the side of this page for the updated version of the Zoning Code components. In addition, there is a summary of the changes provided below in the "Summary of Updates" section and also in a downloadable pdf document. We also want to share some important information about the draft, outreach, and schedule moving forward.

The second draft incorporates several additions, corrections, and adjustments from our initial discussion with City Council and Planning Commission. The summary of these changes are provided in the sections below. A survey is available to gather specific feedback on considerations to be discussed in our next conversation with City Council and Planning Commission. We welcome the public’s opinion in this matter. You can find the survey below.

Development Moratorium

On July 13th, 2021, Council approved a revised Ordinance 2165, which establishes a temporary (180 day) moratorium that impacts the R1, R1A, R2 and R3 zone districts. The purpose of the moratorium is to allow the City to finalize the zoning code rewrite and conduct the public process that leads to formal adoption by City Council, which is targeted to occur by the end of 2021. The zoning code rewrite is intended to address the scale of development and better ensure that structures are appropriate for the neighborhood context. The moratorium prevents any new dwelling unit structures or the expansion of existing dwelling unit structures during this time period, which impacts single family, accessory dwelling units, duplex and multifamily structures during the 180 time period in the above mentioned zone districts. The moratorium does not impact non-household structures such as sheds, detached garages, fences, pergolas, decks and similar structures.

Timeline to Code Adoption and End of Moratorium

  • July 20: City Council Study Session on 2nd Draft
  • August/September: Final draft and legal review of Title 17 and 18 code changes
  • September: Neighborhood open house meeting to finalize zoning code map
  • October through December: Zoning code adoption process (Planning Commission and City Council)

Code Test Simulations Now Available

CORE - R2 Simulation Test

NEIGHBORHOOD CORRIDOR - Simulation Test

CORE / TRANSITION - R3 (Preservation) - Simulation Test

Three testing simulations are now available for public reference. The purpose of these testing documents is to provide comparisons between potential development scenarios in different context areas where the new code will be applied. The testing examples provide an accurate and complete comparison between the existing code and the draft code. Several different scenarios are provided within each simulation test as well as descriptive explanations.

Consistent with the Diagnostic Report, the new code aims to address the following, identified issues more appropriately than the existing code.

  • Incompatible setbacks and bulk plane –The current bulk plane regulation doesn’t go far enough to help regenerate common forms found within the neighborhood. The new code offers additional controls to assist with this idea.
  • Scale and size of new buildings – “The larger the lot, the larger the building” is a rule of thumb that is unfortunately associated with our current code. The new code counteracts this permission by placing a cap on the overall size of the structure.
  • Size of the lot – the original zoning ordinance (1949) only required 4,500 square feet minimum lot sizes of single-family homes. It wasn’t until 1960 that this number increased to 7,000 square feet. The new code reintroduces these smaller lot sizes as a means of reconfiguring large, multi-family buildings into a new multi-family development type that incorporates a series of smaller, detached structures. This will help recreate this older form of development when new development occurs.


City Council Study Session

Once we’ve all had time to digest the code, City Council will review comments and findings on July 20. This will be the opportunity for Planning Commission and City Council to provide staff with further direction. You may attend the meeting in person in Council Chambers (911 10th Street) on July 20 at 6:30 p.m. (please note: this is a study session, so there will be no opportunity for public comment at this particular meeting) or watch the meeting at GCO.tv or www.cityofgolden.net/agendas.

A lead in presentation can be viewed below. This presentation discusses the "Core" simulation above and talks about the 2nd Draft's updates.

2nd Draft Presentation

Mapping Process and Future Outreach

The draft zoning code can only take effect once the form zones are mapped to the city and the new zoning map is adopted by City Council. Beginning in the fall, staff will be engaging with the community at the neighborhood level to discuss how to apply the form zones across each neighborhood. We plan to meet with following neighborhoods initially:

  1. North Neighborhoods (properties north of Highway 58)
  2. Downtown Residents (8th / 9th Street Neighborhoods & 12th Street Neighborhood)
  3. Central Neighborhoods (East Street & CMU Neighborhoods along Jackson and Ford Street Corridors)
  4. Future Meetings for the South Neighborhoods will be determined after this first round

Summary of Updates

Building Form Zones & Adjustments

The modifications made to the form zones for Draft 2 consists of a variety of elements ranging from the exclusion of various form types in certain areas to minor adjustments made to the boundaries of the form zones themselves.

Urban Duplex

First and foremost, the Urban Duplex and Compact Urban Duplex have been removed from the Transition form zone based on feedback received from the public as well as City Council. These form types are still permitted under the Edge, Urban Edge, Main Street, and Strip form zones as they represent the highest density form zones across the city. Further consideration will be given to these form types when we enter the mapping phase of the code rewrite. (Section 18.29.100 under Form Zones & Building Form Types provides a description of each form zone and the form types permitted within.)

Peripheral / R1 & R1A Use Zones

Another large scale change related to the form zones is oriented around the R1 zone districts: R1 and R1A. The Peripheral form zone that includes the R1 zone districts now only permits a limited number of form types (3), which are all single household unit types. These include the Suburban House form type with its side-drive variant and the Village House form type that accommodates alley-loaded properties. It should be emphasized that these form types will not permit small lot subdivision, and the minimum lot sizes required for each will be consistent with what is permitted in the code today. However, the total size of the overall development will be capped at 3,200 above grade finished square feet (Suburban House type). However, this 3,200 square foot cap would not include finished basements, garages, attics, or other unconditioned accessory buildings. ADUs, on the other hand, are included in the total. (Section 18.29.107, page 13 under Form Zones & Building Form Types describes the Peripheral)

RE Use Zone

The RE zone district has been removed from the rezoning effort entirely. It shall be subject to existing zoning standards moving forward, as there are no current form types that would address the lower height limit and larger setbacks found in this zone district. We are testing in our survey whether to add a maximum square footage limitation for future RE developments. We are considering limiting the total square footage for a new development to 3,200 square feet. This total would NOT include finished basements and unconditioned spaces like garages. It would be limited to above-ground conditioned space and ADUs if applicable. Please see survey below.

Map Adjustments

Finally, the form zone map has been updated based on feedback received during the first public outreach phase. This is not the final map, just a placeholder until the individual neighborhood engagement meetings occur and more specific input is received. These current modifications include the following areas:

  1. The half block near the intersection of 9th and Arapahoe has been adjusted to Transition.
  2. The north block of 9th street between Maple Street and Illinois Street has been adjusted to Core.
  3. Commercial properties in the West Downtown neighborhood between Miner’s Alley and Arapahoe Street have been adjusted to Main Street A.
  4. The Jackson Street corridor between 15th Street and 20th Street has been adjusted to Main Street B.
  5. All RE zoned properties have been removed from the zoning overlay map.

Building Form Types

The Form Types in the proposed code draft have largely remained unchanged aside from some significant adjustments related to parking, dwelling unit clarifications, and preservation.

New Form Types

As mentioned, most of the changes related to the form types involved removing certain form types from particular contexts across the city. With that said, there are two new form types we are adding to the code to assist with the development of residential structures on steep slopes. These are titled the Uphill House and the Uphill Duplex. These form types permit a direct access scenario directly from the frontage street to a garage position near the front setback of the lot. This accommodation was made with the understanding that it is very difficult to develop elements of a residence towards the rear of the lot where steep slopes are present on these properties. (p.37 and p.68 under Form Zones & Building Form Types)

Number of Dwellings / ADUs

In addition to these changes, we have updated several of the residential form types to indicate the number of dwelling units permitted and clearly indicated whether a form type allows for the development of an accessory dwelling unit.

(All House, Cottage, Compound, Cluster, Duplex, Row House, and Apartment building form types, except for the Four-Story Courtyard Apartment building form types have been adjusted accordingly under Form Zones & Building Form Types.)

Parking

Per the feedback we received from both the community and City Council, commercial uses will now reference the existing commercial parking standards housed in Chapter 18.36 of the new code. Each form type permitted in both a residential and/or commercial area of the city now has a residential standard as well as the reference to 18.36 for commercial uses. These updates have been made to the form zone sheets directly.

Preservation

The proposed form-based code offers the unique opportunity to enhance preservation across the City. One example of its approach is the ability to preserve an existing small structure on a lot but permit the construction of a second similar structure on the same property. The existing code makes this scenario impossible and promotes scraping and redevelopment – most recently in the form of large-scale duplexes.

In an effort to make preservation of existing home even more attractive, the code draft has been revised to permit more flexibility if a property owner wishes to expand an existing home.

Mostly Preserved Structure

The revised code draft introduces a process to establish a “Mostly Preserved Structure.” In this scenario, if 75% or more of an existing structure is preserved, the setback and building heights in the middle/rear of the lot are relaxed to allow the property owner to more easily add an addition. This process is identified as the “mostly preserved structure” process. For properties located in the historic districts, it shall be the role of Historic Preservation Board to grant a development a "Mostly Preserved Structure" status. However, this process will be available for structures outside the historic districts, and in this scenario, the planning division will confirm that 75% of the structure is being preserved prior to initiating a review for site development. Notes allowing for this accommodation have been added to the Side-Drive House, Village House, Cottage, Side-Drive Cottage and Duplex building form types. (See definition for "Mostly Preserved Structure" page 30 in 18.29.210 Form Zones and Building Form Types)

Building Form and Development Review

The proposed zoning draft outlines a process discussed with City Council and Planning Commission that will make all development proposals available to the public to review for a set amount of time after the planning division staff has made a determination to approve or deny a submission.

Calling Up an Application

Once an application to develop a form type has been reviewed administratively by staff, staff will create a report and analysis of the application materials and post it to Guiding Golden in its entirety for the community to review and ask questions. This review period will last for 15 days from the date posted. If any code requirements are observed by the public to have not been met within this review period of staff’s decision (with reference to the approval criteria for an application), and If City Council feels that the code deficiencies observed by the public are warranted, Council shall have the right to “call up” an application to be reviewed by the Planning Commission. (Section 18.29.400 page 108 in Form Zones and Building Form Types)

Landscaping & Site Development Standards

The new Landscaping and Site Development Regulations section has been updated to incorporate water conscious standards into our regulations moving forward.

Xeric Landscaping

The proposed draft of the code now requires at least 50% of the selected plant materials to come from recommended xeric plant materials lists. In addition, water conscious irrigation systems are now required. Additional guidelines have been implemented to encourage water-conscious practices with new developments. (Chapter 18.40)

Sidewalk Standards

The sidewalk standards from the existing code have been relocated to this section.(Chapter 18.40 page 2)

Shed Standards

Accommodations for accessory structures such as utility sheds have been added to the document. (Chapter 18.40 page 12)


The digital version of the form zone map makes it easy search the map for property addresses and see what form zone your property is in.


Don't Zone Out, Zone In!

Simply put, our zoning code is old… really old! It was developed over 50 years ago and although it’s been built upon and adjusted over the years, it’s not enough. The foundation of the code was based on an era long gone and those development preferences don’t represent the Golden community of today. Our decisions as a city are rooted in Golden Vision 2030, a document that is based off the vision, values, and needs expressed to us by you, our Golden community. We believe the Zoning Code should reflect those same modern beliefs.

So here we are, with a draft of the Zoning Code Rewrite based on a lot of research, work and insight from our consultants and community members who know the ins and outs of zoning. But they’re not the only ones affected by a rewrite. The truth is, anyone who works or lives in the City is impacted by pieces of the zoning code every day. That’s why it’s important to get your thoughts and feedback on this draft before we move forward. On Jan. 28, 2021 the Zoning Code Rewrite draft was unveiled at a virtual community meeting. You will find that draft and a video of the meeting right here.

Still can’t find what you need? Contact Cory Miller – cmiller@cityofgolden.net

2nd Draft Comments

Thank you for taking the time to review the 2nd draft of the Zoning Code Rewrite. If you haven't had the opportunity to take our survey please do so (link at top of the page). If you have direct questions about the code, please contact planning staff directly (planning@cityofgolden.net). You are also encouraged to participate in our weekly office hours (every Thursday, 4:30 to 6:00pm until July 8th). If you have additional input, please feel free to use the space below. 

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The Coors Tek neighborhood meeting was very well attended. I think that can be attributed in part to the letters they mailed to the near by neighbors, the signs posted on highway 58 and at 9th and Washington, and the presentations they made to various boards. Please consider mailings, digital signs, the informer, a water bill insert and social media to advertise the neighborhood open houses.

derosagoco 2 months ago
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Thank you for providing the simulation examples. In preparation for the neighborhood meetings, I think it would be very helpful to provide "real life photographs" of the building form types allowed in each neighborhood at the open house meetings. While I appreciate the simulation drawings, I think I would grasp it better if I could see a video simulation of each of the types allowed using an actual property in the zone.

derosagoco 2 months ago
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There is a provision in the code for two city councilors to flag a project for review. The timeframe (2 weeks) and requirements (cite the specific part of code not followed) in addition to the fact that a city councilor is the only one who can do it (why not planning commission?) is a very high bar. This sounds like a process put in place so we can say it's there but to discourage the process from happening. Can we extend the timeframe, allow planning commission to flag a project, and not require the specific part of the code to be identified initially? It would obviously need to be identified at some point, but the code is complicated, and a full review takes time.

Minihane 2 months ago
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I want to support camerdb's comments about intention statements. They are often used to make decisions on whether an application meets the code requirements. Camerdb's proposed revisions to the intention statements are well thought out, and would improve the code language. Please consider including them.

Minihane 2 months ago
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I understand that many changes were made in response to community input, such as removing Beverly Heights from this zoning code and removing the option for dividing lots. It feels like a lost opportunity. Hopefully we can move forward, acknowledging that development will continue, and incorporate additional "smart growth" principles in the future so that as growth continues, we do it in a way that makes sense for us as a community.

Minihane 2 months ago
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Frustrated to see the general removal of detached multi-family dwellings sharing a current lot. This seemed like a nice innovation that provided flexibility and density without the giant--typically high end--apartment/condo buildings currently going up.

A key missing aspect is more explicit support affordable housing. We need teachers, police, and others to be able to live IN our community.

bpalmintier 3 months ago
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In the landscape standards there are callouts for the Director of Community and Economic Development to make decisions on sidewalks. I would again propose that the title and role be changed to Director of Planning and Neighborhood Preservation so as to drive decisions toward protecting the town's character which was a goal of this rewrite. Also, it is lazy, IMHO to show a picture of an urban type landscape from another town, "The character of the sidewalk and tree lawn varies by context. The image above of Wenatchee, WA shows a main street character." on page two of the document. An example can readily be found in town that can be a real life example.

camerdb 3 months ago
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I see that my property at 818 9th St has been included in the "Transition" remapping. I am not sure why this was done, and using the provided definition of Transition, it doesn't make sense at all. The half block (as defined in Rev. 2) east of Arapahoe to Washington contains properties in the 8th/9th st Historic District that don't fit the Transition model at all. Can you provide reasoning for this?

canyon conch 3 months ago
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The code simulation is a good start on showing how the new code could result in better, more compatible buildings. The core area also allows a village duplex which is pretty big, bulky, and doesn't do as nice a job of fitting in as the other examples chosen for the simulation. I assume the simulation shows maximum projections allowed for the village duplex? If not, it should. What this whole simulation shows, and what I think is clear after diving in a little, is that there are still some large bulky forms allowed in some parts of the city and there are no carrots to drive people to smaller footprint buildings. We could create a path that no one takes. We need to discourage large structures in favor of for sale smaller structures.

camerdb 3 months ago
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Intention Statements are a way to address issues that have nuance. Here is a link to a proposed update to intention statements that will allow us to protect our character better and link to the comprehensive plan and neighborhood plans.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1xRJQ0juats7lGthMs81tjen5qE2p-Uj9/view?usp=sharing

camerdb 3 months ago
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The Mainstreet B and Mainstreet A changes in central neighborhood are also slipping in a height change from existing. MSB is 55feet versus CC2 at 50 feet. MSA is 38 feet versus CC1 of 30 feet. Both of these may be too intense for the area, but of the two, the MSB bothers me more, especially south of 19th street. I maintained when it was CMU, and still maintain today that 20th should be treated as NC or T or something less intense than MSB or CC2. Regardless of willingness to make that change, the height change, particularly in MSA is significant, over 20%. The setbacks also are much different than what was agreed to more recently, 20 feet or so in this area. The change to MSA/MSB will create more of an urban feel and that was not the plan, more of a mixed/integrated into existing.

camerdb 3 months ago
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Page last updated: 02 September 2021, 15:19