Council Connects

Front view of Golden City Hall over city logo

In an effort to be open and transparent, the City of Golden has created this page for City Councilors to share information with each other and with the community. Though there is not an opportunity for dialog between City Council and the community here, residents are encouraged to reach out to City Council via councilcomments@cityofgolden.net. This email will distribute to all City Councilors as well as city staff department leads. If you would like to reach out to individual City Councilors, email addresses and phone numbers are available on the Meet Your Council Members tab below.


In an effort to be open and transparent, the City of Golden has created this page for City Councilors to share information with each other and with the community. Though there is not an opportunity for dialog between City Council and the community here, residents are encouraged to reach out to City Council via councilcomments@cityofgolden.net. This email will distribute to all City Councilors as well as city staff department leads. If you would like to reach out to individual City Councilors, email addresses and phone numbers are available on the Meet Your Council Members tab below.


Notes from Council

In an effort to be as open and transparent as possible, Council Members will use this tool to share ideas and thoughts, including information they learn from other groups, to city discussions.  

Council members are only sharing ideas on this public forum, not holding conversations with one another or with the community.

Please visit one of our Council meetings where you may sign up to share your ideas with City Council, or contact your Council members directly by email at councilcomments@cityofgolden.net.This email will distribute to all City Councilors as well as city staff department leads. If you would like to reach out to individual City Councilors, email addresses and phone numbers are available on the Meet Your Council Members tab.

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DRCOG - SMALL CITIES HOT TOPICS
Virtual meeting only
Friday, October 23, 2020 - 9:00am to 11:30am
Check it out and use the link below to register
https://drcog.org/node/978045/register

JimDale over 3 years ago

FROM DRCOG & SMART CITIES
Winter Is Coming: Four Ways To Keep Snowy Cities Moving During the Pandemic
Much indoor entertainment won't be safe this winter — which means it's past time to make outdoor transportation and recreation safe.
By Kea Wilson
Sep 23, 2020
This holiday light display was installed in the Green Bay botanical gardens — but cities might be wise to add beautiful, stroll-friendly features to their Open Streets events this winter. Source: Creative Commons.
This holiday light display was installed in the Green Bay botanical gardens — but cities might be wise to add beautiful, stroll-friendly features to their Open Streets events this winter. Source: Creative Commons.
Communities across the northern U.S. are bracing for a cold and early winter — and a predicted new surge in COVID-19 infections. But many aren’t doing much to outfit their transportation networks for the realities of harsh weather amid a public health threat.

In an informal review of the 10 largest cities with snowy winters, Streetsblog found that few had put forward comprehensive plans to meet the most commonly anticipated challenges of a coronawinter: low public transit ridership, higher-than-average interest in active transportation, and a high probability that children will need to play in neighborhoods rather than in school yards because of school closures. Because COVID-19 transmission happens much more often in indoor settings than outdoors, cities must make cold-weather transportation and recreation attractive alternatives to riskier indoor activities.

Here are some measures that cities are taking to keep citizens safe when they’re moving around — and a few they might consider.

Winter-ready (and COVID-safe) outdoor gathering spaces

The dining industry is working hard to get ready for bad weather — but not everyone can afford to patronize a restaurant with a patio. Luckily, many strategies that restaurants are using can be repurposed for public spaces with a little civic investment or creativity.

Cities such as Chicago, Ill., and Washington, D.C., are sponsoring programs to encourage restauranteurs to winterize their outdoor streateries, with the nation’s capitol doling out a whopping $4 million (or a maximum of $6,000 per business) to buy outdoor heaters, canopies, and even ad space to publicize corona-safe dining options. If that money were spread around a little, cities could outfit similar seating areas in parks, squares, and even parking spaces with similar amenities, so that non-paying customers — particularly the unhoused — could benefit from them, too.

Some interventions don’t require any cash: Simple shifts, such as working with local fire departments to legalize the use of charcoal grills in park facilities as heating, could make a difference, according to experts quoted in a recent Bloomberg article.

But many creative ideas for outdoor gathering spaces are coming from the restaurant industry, with such Instagram-worthy ideas as radiant-heated stools, mini-yurts for two, solar-powered heaters built right into patio umbrellas and whatever these inflatable fishbowl things are.


Winterize the bus network

America’s bus shelters are long overdue for some cold- and wet-weather amenities — especially when we could afford to outfit every bus stop in America with a basic awning for less than the cost of a single large highway project. But, of the cities we’ reviewed, none has optimized its transit stops for winter. That’s disappointing. Giving riders generous space to spread out under wide awnings — even if they’re cheap and temporary — could be crucial once snow starts.


Even though more and more studies show that transit is fairly safe during the pandemic (as long as everyone wears masks), experts generally agree that riders should limit time spent in enclosed buses. Chicago got the memo and instituted pop-up bus rapid transit lanes this week; other cities would be wise to follow suit.

Sidewalk (and bike lane, and wheelchair ramp) snow clearance

Most American cities leave sidewalk snow clearance to property owners — a disaster for accessibility in any city in which home- and business-owners aren’t always on top of their winter chores (or even physically able to wield a snow-blower). But rather than treating walking (and biking) infrastructure as essential for transportation and recommending city-sponsored shoveling, the Federal Highway Administration advises cities to “empower neighbors to come together” and do the work for free, using such helpful, cutting-edge resources as … “a brochure that provides clear diagrams and instructions on where and how to remove snow and ice.”

There is no more important time than now for communities to sponsor broad sidewalk, bike lane, and wheelchair-ramp snow clearance citywide — as snowy Duluth, Minn., did even before COVID — or, at least, clear the routes that non-drivers use most heavily. With an employment crisis, paying residents to do the essential work of running a mini-plow and laying down eco-friendly road salt alternatives is an easy way to get people back to work.

Streets built for strolling (and a little shopping)

We’re officially pulling a Mariah Carey and calling it now: Americans should skip Thanksgiving and put up the holiday lights stat.

Kidding aside: Although some cities are calling off their Candy Cane Lane events months before the first snowflakes, some cities are planning more expansive outdoor spectacles with social distancing in mind. Not all are festive: Outdoor art and shopping walks have been a winter mainstay in snowier places that recognize that closing a street to car traffic — and opening it to local vendors and makers — is a far better use for road space than moving motor vehicles.

Preventing crowds involves little more than requiring reservations for guests and signage on the route to keep them moving, which many events, such as Minnesota’s famous Luminary Loppet winter festival, already required pre-COVID. Making events free and centering the needs of often underserved residents, such as Black business owners, could be an even better investment in local economies.


This brief list shows that cities are starting to innovate as they head into the cold season — but our cold-weather street strategies should grow a lot by the spring thaw.

Let’s press local leaders – and the national leaders who are still failing to provide crucial COVID relief — to outfit our streets, but also to provide residents with everything they need to safely travel and socialize in outdoor public spaces year round. Snow tires on bikes and wheelchairs, along with winter camping gear for unhoused people who struggle in traditional shelter environments, should be considered essential services and provided or heavily subsidized by transportation departments. Recreation departments should reach beyond the indoor skating rink and repurpose parking lots into places to play in the cold. Most important, let’s ask residents what they want for their public spaces this winter, invite them to dream big, and get creative to make it happen.



Filed Under: Bicycling, Coronavirus, COVID-19, pedestrians, Winter, Promoted

JimDale over 3 years ago

MMC HOUSING/HOMELESSNESS/HUNGER CMTE: Presentation from Mayor Hancock and Britta Fisher, ED of Dept of Housing Stability (HOST) - 35% of guests at Denver's auxiliary shelter at the National Western Center had previously been housed or sheltered in a metro-area city or county outside of Denver (another 16% had been sleeping outside) highlighting the need to address homelessness regionally. Checkout their video about Denver's housing first approach - https://youtu.be/DE8Wti4jbvQ

Laura Weinberg over 3 years ago

ROCKY FLATS STEWARDSHIP COUNCIL: I forgot to mention I attended the RFSC meeting last Monday.

Parkway route deemed safe to proceed with work by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE):
The key take away, amongst other topics, was that the CDPHE, Hazardous Waste Division, reviewed all the data on the soil tests along the "Jefferson County Parkway" proposed route, including retests of the sample that had been found elevated, all were found to be safe for the workers that might work on the proposed parkway. (BTW, the Broomfield City Council has voted to pull out of the Parkway Authority.) The report from CDPHE is available for review. It is a scientific report and at least one RFSC member was concerned that it wasn't written in layman understandable language.

JimDale almost 4 years ago

TOGETHER WE BUILD: How Federal Infrastructure Investments Can Put Coloradans Back To Work - https://coloradoconcern.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Full-Infrastructure-Report.pdf

Laura Weinberg almost 4 years ago

CO Health Foundation Poll - https://copulsepoll.org

Laura Weinberg almost 4 years ago

FEEDBACK FROM MEETINGS AND EVENTS:
CBAC:
1. Sales taxes still down - best guess for the year is about 8% down.
2. Cyber Security and IT topics, Jiles McCoy: a very good overview of ongoing programs and view of the future.
3. CIP and Revenue Manual discussion - feedback to Jason and Jeff.
TOWN & GOWN BOOK CLUB/GROUP (TNGN)
I moderated a discussion on the book, DEADLIEST ENEMIES - Our War Against Killer Germs -by Michael Osterholm & Mark Olshaker. This book predicted what we are facing today and in the future. Dr Osterholm is the Executive Director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research & Policy (CIDRAP) at the U of Minnesota.
DRCOG Finance and Budget Committee:
1. Did first review of the DRCOG BUDGET
2. Approved contracts for:
A. Refuge support through the Area Agency for the Aging
B. Consultation Pass Through for RTD Accountability
DRCOG BOARD OF DIRECTORS:
1. Viewed a Metro Denver EDCOM Video which advertised the area including Golden (view at ResilientDenver.com)
2. BIKE TO WHEREEVER - virtual effort replacing Bike to Work (sign up at biketowhereever.com)
3. Small Area/Town Forecast work is ongoing: useful for city planning.
4. Two good DRCOG Email Newsletters (distributed/emailed by Dr Flo Ratano : Director of DRCOG Outreach etc.)
a. Somewhat Weekly/Periodically Smart Cities Newsletter
b. Hot Topics Tribune - for small cities
RTD Update
1. New CEO: she is the past Director of Transit from Long Beach CA
2. Budget gap of $200+M
3. North line opens Monday - free rides

JimDale almost 4 years ago

Note the News/Media on COVID-19 case surges at CU & DU. I'm hopefully our CSM students continue to follow good public health practices as I have observed them doing.

JimDale almost 4 years ago

OBSERVATIONS CONCERNING A SECOND WAVE (WALL STREET JOURNAL):
Israel to Shut Down Again as Second Coronavirus Wave Hits
Cabinet backs new lockdown, set to extend over Jewish holidays; essential businesses to stay open
By Felicia Schwartz and Dov Lieber
Updated Sept. 13, 2020 7:43 pm ET

JimDale almost 4 years ago
JimDale almost 4 years ago

CORONA VIRUS ON CAMPUSES - NYT:
What began as a trickle of coronavirus infections among college students is now a flood: In the past week, American colleges recorded more than 36,000 additional cases, according to a Times survey.

That brings the total of campus infections to 88,000 since the pandemic began. Public health experts say colleges and universities, like the State University of New York at Oneonta, above, as a category have become hot spots much as hospitals, nursing homes and meat packing plants were earlier in the year.

Even the most comprehensive approaches to containing the virus can break down. One oversight at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: Its experts assumed that students would stop partying after they received a positive test result.

JimDale almost 4 years ago

A 'uniquely LA' streetlight design will soon illuminate the City of Angels

Project Room won Los Angeles' streetlight design competition with its Superbloom concept, described as a streetlight "bouquet" with extra arms for features such as pedestrian fixtures or solar panels.

JimDale almost 4 years ago

THOUGHTS ON THE RECENT CDC POSITION ON TESTING FOR COVID -19 - for your reflection.

The American Public Health Association is deeply concerned about new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance that could reduce COVID-19 testing for at-risk individuals who are asymptomatic. We are unaware of any new data to merit this change, which is inconsistent with current public health practices.



This press release was sent out today to 526 media outlets across the country.



Date: Aug 27 2020

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Media Relations

Statement from APHA Executive Director George C. Benjamin, MD

The American Public Health Association is deeply concerned about new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance that could reduce COVID-19 testing for at-risk individuals who are asymptomatic. We are unaware of any new data to merit this change, which is inconsistent with current public health practices.



In a dramatic shift from previous federal guidelines, the CDC disclosed that some people without COVID-19 symptoms may not need to be tested, even though they may have been in close contact with an infected person. This is inconsistent with the evidence that shows up to 40% of individuals who are infected spread the virus asymptomatically. It is also unclear what problem this change solves.



We are also concerned that this change was made without effective consultation with public health professionals who are on the ground managing this outbreak. It makes the messaging confusing and may reduce access for those needing testing. Lack of access to adequate testing has been a significant barrier to getting effective disease control of this pandemic.



The CDC remains our nation’s crown jewel of agencies for public health practice. This change and the process that resulted in its promotion puts that reputation at risk. We are also concerned that this change was the result of political pressure.

At a time when we don’t have clear, unified national leadership, we urge our federal public health officials to stand up for science and for the health of all of us.

JimDale almost 4 years ago

DRCOG's Finance and Budget Committee - we met and approved two contracts for the Area Agency for the Aging: for Tri-County Public Health to do outreach for Seniors & another to develop Ride Share software for seniors with needs to get to grocery stores, medical appointments etc. Another contract for support of the development of the Metro Vison 2050 plan was also approved.
JEFFCO PH FOOD COUNCIL:
1. JCPH hired a Food Distribution Coordinator with CARES Act funds to coordinate distribution from all the food panties in Jeffco.
2. Urban Farming: Go Farm and JCPH contracted with a GIS expert to identify and map land that could be used for farming in Jeffco.
3. The Council has develop an Draft Equity Position and mention coordinating with our Equity subcommittee.
4. SNAP (Food Stamp) Recruiter/Navigator: Moriah Bell is helping folks with this. Many of the hungry in need don't know what is available to them.
5. Give and Grow: CSU Extention manages this program. It is a great wsay to share you extra produce from you "Victory Garden" - more info at http://growandgivecolorado.org and growandgive@csu.edu

JimDale almost 4 years ago

Opportunity to sign onto a letter to Gov Polis by Aug 10: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdyauBkHdhBNamey2Uprz_10MU9Ch0sW6bnhJTVHWah3sQ3Cg/viewform
LEO Climate Letter to Gov. Polis: A letter thanking Gov. Polis for his climate action and asking him to stay committed to meeting state wide climate goals.

JJ Trout almost 4 years ago

DRCOG Update:
I attended , virtually, three DRCOG meetings:
1. Regional Transportation Committee (Alternate Member)
2. DRCOG Budget and Finance Committee (Member)
3. DRCOG Board of Directors (Director/Member)
The key topics included the
1. 2050 Regional Transportation Plan available on the DRCOG website
2. Safer Main Streets - a potential funding source for Golden
3. The TIP (Transportation Improvement Program)
The Transportation Improvement Program. The Denver region (DRCOG) implements the fiscally constrained short-range transportation plan through DRCOG's Transportation Improvement Program (TIP). The TIP identifies all current federally funded transportation projects to be completed in the Denver region over a four-year period.
COVID-19 has presented some challenges related to funding/completion of current ongoing projects. Cities and Counties are being impact financially and local matching funds for some of the projects might not be forthcoming thus DRCOG staff has recommended some alternatives including: waiver of established TIP policy; reprogramming of Federal funds; and use of the "Colorado Toll Credit Fund" to help back-fill needs. This Toll Credit fund, managed by CDOT, has $800 M in the bank. DRCOG will reach out to the Subregions (Counties and their cities) so that the membership can provide input to resolve the challenges caused by the pandemic. Our Golden staff and I will have to stay on top of this. Recommendations from the Subregions will go back through the Regional Transportation Committee and on to the DRCOG Board of Directors for final decisions.

JimDale almost 4 years ago

"How can we improve police and community relationships?" - excellent webinar from the CU Denver School of Public Health on 6/30/20. Video is now available https://youtu.be/P-reKVnoIRE

Laura Weinberg almost 4 years ago

Interesting cautionary tale and picture from a Medical Historian from the University of Michigan regarding the Denver response to the 1918 Flu epidemic:

https://coloradosun.com/2020/07/11/denver-residents-refused-to-wear-masks-during-1918-pandemic-what-have-we-learned/

BFisher almost 4 years ago

FACE MASKS: I know Council continues to receive many messages about face coverings in Golden. The Resolution passed 5/6/20 addresses private businesses requiring masks. The City requires masks in all public buildings. The city is posting signs along trails, parks and busy streets and working to reinforce mask wearing everywhere. If council members would like to discuss face coverings again, let me or the city manager know to put it on a future agenda. Wheat Ridge's resolution keeps being mentioned from members of the community. Here is the relevant language from their resolution "Section 1. Face Covering Request. The City Council hereby extends its action regarding face coverings contained in Resolution 26, Series 2020, by enacting the following Request:
A. All persons entering an establishment open to the public as defined by the Fourth Amended Public Health Order 20-28 (May 26, 2020) of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, are hereby requested to wear medical or non-medical cloth face coverings, such as to cover their nose and mouth, when entering any such business and in conducting any interactions within such business.
B. This Request is necessary to reduce the spread of COVID-19 and protect the health of essential workers and the residents and visitors of the City. This Request shall go into effect upon adoption of this Resolution and shall expire at midnight on June 22, 2020, unless it is earlier terminated or extended.
C. This Request is permitted to be more restrictive than any state-issued stay at home order or other public health order, as permitted by the Governor's stay at home orders and associated orders of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. D.The Council strongly urges all citizens, for your own health and safety, and forthat of the brave citizens who are staffing the grocery stores, pharmacies andother businesses that are so critical to our daily needs, to comply with thisRequest. It is only through our collective efforts that we can protect thosepersons, ourselves and our families. The Council genuinely appreciates yourvoluntary cooperation.
E.The Council further recommends that business establishments post notice to thepublic of the recommendation contained in this Request."

Laura Weinberg almost 4 years ago

POLICING: A couple of excellent resources -----The Final Report of the Task Force on 21st Century Policing. https://cdn.ymaws.com/www.michiganpolicechiefs.org/resource/resmgr/21st_references/21st.Century.TaskForce_Final.pdf ----- Starting with What Works: Using Evidence-Based Strategies to Improve Community-Police Relations https://www.theiacp.org/sites/default/files/all/s/StartingwithWhatWorksBrochureWeb.pdf

Laura Weinberg almost 4 years ago
Page last updated: 06 Jun 2024, 01:22 PM