Striving for Racial Equity

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The City of Golden strives to be a diverse, inclusive community and a place for all people to feel valued, safe, and welcome. We acknowledge that the work is ongoing to become an anti-racist city and community. The iconic arch over Downtown Golden is a message we want all to know: YOU are welcome here. The strength and endurance behind the message come from the Golden 2030 Heart and Soul values of a city government that is responsive, approachable, good at listening, welcomes participation and involvement, is fair to all parts of the city, and is accountable. In the spirit of these values, the Golden City Council passed a resolution declaring racism a public health crisis on June 11, 2020.

The current pandemic has made clear the health disparities that have existed in America for more than 400 years. It is shining a stark light upon the long-running racial divide; COVID-19 is killing Black people at higher rates than the rate of White people, and Black people are disproportionately suffering in part due to long-standing, unaddressed health disparities as well as systematic racism and other socioeconomic inequities.

The dark and racist history of our city and our entire country has led to many current-day disparities in education, health and safety, job attainment, income and wealth; housing and healthcare; disproportionate incarceration rates for people of color; and other systems of injustice. City Council further recognizes the existence of White privilege, meaning the systemic advantages that White people have relative to people of color and the role it plays in our policies. The deadly police brutality against George Floyd in Minneapolis is one of the most recent examples of this culture of hate and racism that must change. But we can’t wait for change, we must be the change.

The City of Golden is dedicated to listening, learning, and acting to advance racial equity. In light of current events and a loss of trust in law enforcement, we are sharing all of our police procedures and policies so that we can start a dialogue with the community about how we police, and what procedures can use improvement. Golden City Council met in study session with the heads of the Golden Police Department on Thursday, July 16 to get this discussion started. We also encourage our community to join us on GuidingGolden.com to help us find ways to make Golden a more inclusive community. We will also seek out trainings to make us more conscious of issues in our community and continue to find other ways to engage our community in a conversation.

In addition to engaging in the conversation, City Council highly encourages you to use your vote. With elections coming up, this is the time to stand for equality by voting for laws and lawmakers who will bring positive changes to our world. “It is not enough to vote in big races at the top of the ballot,” stated Mayor Weinberg. “If you want equity in the criminal justice system and improvements at a local level, you must vote for your county sheriff, local district attorney, and county and state representatives. We have a primary this month and an election in November. The people that we put in office at all levels of government will either support the changes that are needed or will be the barriers to that progress. Don’t march on the streets now and sit on the sidelines in November. VOTE!”

-------------------------------

A Message from Golden Mayor Laura Weinberg

“I want to express my deep sadness and anger about racist incidents and Black lives cut short. People across the country, and here in Denver, are using peaceful protests and rallies to say enough is enough. Enough to ongoing racial prejudice, enough to unequal justice, enough to the killings. Marching, kneeling, or gathering together is a way to express the sadness, the impotence, the frustrations that nothing seems to change or get better. Americans have long used the power of protest in this country to affect changes, but more is needed then just showing up in the streets.”

---------------------------------

The Golden City Council commits to listening & learning, acting, and changing to advance racial equity and improve the quality of life for all in Golden.

Listen & Learn

  • We created this page to engage and listen to the community about how Golden can be more welcoming and inclusive.
  • We are seeking out trainings that make us more conscious of issues in our community and how to avoid and stamp out systemic racism.

Action

City Council Takes Action Against Racism

At the City Council meeting on Aug. 27, councilors made a commitment to the Golden community to actively address racial inequities and find short and long-term strategies for being a welcoming and inclusive community.

Earlier this year, Council declared racism to be a public health crisis and committed to “listening, learning, and acting to advance racial equity and improve the quality of life and health for all.” On Guiding Golden there is a page dedicated to this important topic at www.guidinggolden.net/StrivingForRacialEquity. The resolutions passed on Aug. 27 furthered this commitment with some tangible steps forward.

Council authorized a public display of support in the form of a banner under the Welcome to Golden arch that will proclaim, “Golden Stands with Black Lives.” Council member and Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (JEDI) Subcommittee member Councilor Trout said “When I say Golden stands with Black lives, it means I recognize the human dignity of each Black person and I value their life. I want to welcome, include, ensure the safety and security, and make sure all Black lives have equal opportunities to thrive… As a city leader, I am telling everyone that I do not tolerate racism and bigotry. I will stand up for anyone facing discrimination. And most importantly, I am committing myself to do the hard work to make the change.”

City Council unanimously voted in favor of the hard work ahead. In July, City Council established the JEDI subcommittee and by resolution on Aug. 27, authorized and directed the subcommittee to research and explore options for developing an anti-racism plan. This includes finding ways to have community conversations about races, equity, and social justice. The Golden Police department will host a listening session and the subcommittee will schedule a facilitated town hall listening session prior to November.

Racism is not welcome in Golden. The work to ensure an equitable community will be ongoing, and our community will play an important role in this process. As listening opportunities and public meetings are scheduled, we will list them on this page.

Change

Please subscribe to this page by clicking the link bottom right to be contacted with updates to this page, including what changes are happening.

---------------------------------

Start by Educating Yourself

Wondering what you can do? How you can get involved? Here are some resources for you:

The City of Golden strives to be a diverse, inclusive community and a place for all people to feel valued, safe, and welcome. We acknowledge that the work is ongoing to become an anti-racist city and community. The iconic arch over Downtown Golden is a message we want all to know: YOU are welcome here. The strength and endurance behind the message come from the Golden 2030 Heart and Soul values of a city government that is responsive, approachable, good at listening, welcomes participation and involvement, is fair to all parts of the city, and is accountable. In the spirit of these values, the Golden City Council passed a resolution declaring racism a public health crisis on June 11, 2020.

The current pandemic has made clear the health disparities that have existed in America for more than 400 years. It is shining a stark light upon the long-running racial divide; COVID-19 is killing Black people at higher rates than the rate of White people, and Black people are disproportionately suffering in part due to long-standing, unaddressed health disparities as well as systematic racism and other socioeconomic inequities.

The dark and racist history of our city and our entire country has led to many current-day disparities in education, health and safety, job attainment, income and wealth; housing and healthcare; disproportionate incarceration rates for people of color; and other systems of injustice. City Council further recognizes the existence of White privilege, meaning the systemic advantages that White people have relative to people of color and the role it plays in our policies. The deadly police brutality against George Floyd in Minneapolis is one of the most recent examples of this culture of hate and racism that must change. But we can’t wait for change, we must be the change.

The City of Golden is dedicated to listening, learning, and acting to advance racial equity. In light of current events and a loss of trust in law enforcement, we are sharing all of our police procedures and policies so that we can start a dialogue with the community about how we police, and what procedures can use improvement. Golden City Council met in study session with the heads of the Golden Police Department on Thursday, July 16 to get this discussion started. We also encourage our community to join us on GuidingGolden.com to help us find ways to make Golden a more inclusive community. We will also seek out trainings to make us more conscious of issues in our community and continue to find other ways to engage our community in a conversation.

In addition to engaging in the conversation, City Council highly encourages you to use your vote. With elections coming up, this is the time to stand for equality by voting for laws and lawmakers who will bring positive changes to our world. “It is not enough to vote in big races at the top of the ballot,” stated Mayor Weinberg. “If you want equity in the criminal justice system and improvements at a local level, you must vote for your county sheriff, local district attorney, and county and state representatives. We have a primary this month and an election in November. The people that we put in office at all levels of government will either support the changes that are needed or will be the barriers to that progress. Don’t march on the streets now and sit on the sidelines in November. VOTE!”

-------------------------------

A Message from Golden Mayor Laura Weinberg

“I want to express my deep sadness and anger about racist incidents and Black lives cut short. People across the country, and here in Denver, are using peaceful protests and rallies to say enough is enough. Enough to ongoing racial prejudice, enough to unequal justice, enough to the killings. Marching, kneeling, or gathering together is a way to express the sadness, the impotence, the frustrations that nothing seems to change or get better. Americans have long used the power of protest in this country to affect changes, but more is needed then just showing up in the streets.”

---------------------------------

The Golden City Council commits to listening & learning, acting, and changing to advance racial equity and improve the quality of life for all in Golden.

Listen & Learn

  • We created this page to engage and listen to the community about how Golden can be more welcoming and inclusive.
  • We are seeking out trainings that make us more conscious of issues in our community and how to avoid and stamp out systemic racism.

Action

City Council Takes Action Against Racism

At the City Council meeting on Aug. 27, councilors made a commitment to the Golden community to actively address racial inequities and find short and long-term strategies for being a welcoming and inclusive community.

Earlier this year, Council declared racism to be a public health crisis and committed to “listening, learning, and acting to advance racial equity and improve the quality of life and health for all.” On Guiding Golden there is a page dedicated to this important topic at www.guidinggolden.net/StrivingForRacialEquity. The resolutions passed on Aug. 27 furthered this commitment with some tangible steps forward.

Council authorized a public display of support in the form of a banner under the Welcome to Golden arch that will proclaim, “Golden Stands with Black Lives.” Council member and Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (JEDI) Subcommittee member Councilor Trout said “When I say Golden stands with Black lives, it means I recognize the human dignity of each Black person and I value their life. I want to welcome, include, ensure the safety and security, and make sure all Black lives have equal opportunities to thrive… As a city leader, I am telling everyone that I do not tolerate racism and bigotry. I will stand up for anyone facing discrimination. And most importantly, I am committing myself to do the hard work to make the change.”

City Council unanimously voted in favor of the hard work ahead. In July, City Council established the JEDI subcommittee and by resolution on Aug. 27, authorized and directed the subcommittee to research and explore options for developing an anti-racism plan. This includes finding ways to have community conversations about races, equity, and social justice. The Golden Police department will host a listening session and the subcommittee will schedule a facilitated town hall listening session prior to November.

Racism is not welcome in Golden. The work to ensure an equitable community will be ongoing, and our community will play an important role in this process. As listening opportunities and public meetings are scheduled, we will list them on this page.

Change

Please subscribe to this page by clicking the link bottom right to be contacted with updates to this page, including what changes are happening.

---------------------------------

Start by Educating Yourself

Wondering what you can do? How you can get involved? Here are some resources for you:

What makes Golden inclusive and how can we make it feel welcoming for everyone?

We want to hear your thoughts. Our goal is to have a community with its arms wide open to everyone regardless of race, gender identity, ability level or sexual preference. Let us know how we can make everyone feel welcome and at home in Golden.

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Are there any protective plans for Golden in the event rioting occurs on election night? If problems occur, what should homeowners do to protect themselves.

Ginny Burr about 1 month ago

I'm proud to live in a community that has declared racial inequality a public health crisis, and that will publicly announce and affirm that it stands with the African American community. I'm white, and in no way do I feel that by affirming Black Lives Matter I am denigrating anyone else's existence. To be for BLM is not to be against the police, or any other group of people. It's an opportunity for inclusion, and to recognize and validate the lives of people we live with. While I see all of this as signs of progress in our community, we also need to take this opportunity to address structural issues within Golden that may prevent us from becoming a more welcoming community. We need to appropriate funding to help support these early initiatives and make our words count. To that extent, I suggest we begin a general fund, supported by a proportional or progressive tax, and use that fund to help offset housing costs, to offer incentives to black or minority owned businesses, to offer scholarships, etc.

jlatici 2 months ago

I would love to see an integration of the Racial Equity initiative with the Heart of Golden planning. We are spending a lot of time and resources on that plan, and it will impact our community for decades to come. How can we solicit input from appropriate stakeholders to improve our Heart of Golden design ideas to make Golden more welcoming and inclusive for diverse communities?

Minihane 2 months ago

The following is my opinion regarding the city council's decision to install the "We Stand with Black Lives" under the Golden arch. Perhaps some people who opposed this action will better understand the motives of the BLM movement better if they consider the following: +++++++++++++++++++++++Black Live Matter, TooI commend the city council’s decision to hang the “Golden Stands with Black Lives” banner under the Washington Street arch; this is timely and appropriate. For those opposed to this action I would like to address the two most likely reasons for this opposition. The first time some of us came across the proclamation “Black Lives Matter”, it was possible to consider this expression as exclusive to other groups’ value. Of course, all lives matter; how dare they! Well, this issue has dominated our news cycles for the better part of a year and anyone paying the least bit of attention should know that the expression is not meant to exclude any other group, but rather to say that black lives matter just as much as everyone else's. Perhaps a better way to have phrased the intended message is, “Black Lives Matter, Too”. Consequently, it’s possible that the retort of “All lives matter” is an attempt to correct the inferred exclusion of non-blacks. But, what is more likely being implied is a partisan and racist dog whistle. Hopefully, most Goldenites are on the side of inclusion and full rights for all. The second objection is that putting this message on our publicly owned arch is inappropriately putting Golden in the business of advocating a controversial political opinion. There are those who seek to make the Black Lives Matter movement a hotly divided partisan issue to serve election year political means; but this issue is far larger than that. I would compare the Black Lives Matters movement to the Women’s Suffrage movement of the early nineteenth century. Denying an adult American woman the right to vote is arguably less serious than denying our black citizens: equal economic and societal opportunities, and fair and just (and non-fatal) law enforcement. But both fit into the overarching theme of fixing an immoral and unconstitutional disparity. I, for one, am proud of Golden for hanging this banner and would have given my full support to an earlier banner loudly proclaiming, “Golden Supports Women’s Suffrage”. Making difficult social changes usually requires loud and unsettling actions. Kudos Golden, for being on the right side of history.

Jax 2 months ago

The Black Lives banner makes my family and I feel like we are no longer welcome in our own community and we've lived in Golden for nearly a decade. We support equality and have taken initiative to educate ourselves and strive to actively be anti-racist, yet we are now stereotyped as racist simply because of our involvement in law enforcement. Now that the City of Golden has made a stance to support the BLM movement with the banner even with the omission of the word "matter", we no longer feel comfortable supporting our favorite downtown businesses and have discontinued our daily walks along clear creek. Until we know the City of Golden and the council members that voted for this banner also support law enforcement, we don't feel welcome in Golden and feel you have achieved more divide than ever before. It's ironic that there is so much push for equality, yet for GPD and other first responders, they now facing daily prejudice and hate just for their profession.

goldengal 3 months ago

It feels inclusive in terms of socioeconomic status. It does not feel inclusive in terms of race and ethnicity. Can we incentivize black owned businesses in Golden? At least can we actively recruit black owned businesses in Golden?

dsbrisson 3 months ago

It was brought to my attention by the Latin community and Jewish friends that placing a sign under "our" golden welcome sign specifically about the black community is racist within its self. We were under the impression all lives matter not just a specific race. Hopefully you will change the sign to accommodate all races.

RADIOHEAD5000 3 months ago

This is a great addition and seeing this makes me proud to be part of the Golden community. It would be great if Golden considered doing a mural on a side of a building as well, this would be long lasting and add an artistic expression of this important moment in history and support.

kschwaab 3 months ago

This is SO important. Pleased council passed both resolutions last night let’s keep working as a community to do even more better.

fangacx 3 months ago

I found the reply below about Buffalo Bill Days very educational. I had not looked at it that way. The comment made me realize that an in depth look at our celebrations and special events including both both the history of the event and and evaluation of each on a justice, equity, diversity and inclusion rubric. The community conversation about this would reach a larger audience if it was included in the Golden Informer. Progress reports from the Justice, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion in the Golden Informer. Establish a long term time line of plans to implement, conversations to hold and a record of observable changes would be useful to keep the topic in front of us. Historically social issues tend to fade from public view when the news media no longer can present them as an event or crisis. Possibly being a sister city with an equally sized small town that has a more diverse demographic and promoting zoom or other conversations between the residents there and those here would be meaningful in promoting understanding of the issue.

jbharmony 3 months ago

I think we should put on the “Howdie Folks” banner “All Lives Matter so wear your mask!!!”

d00zie 4 months ago

Golden can begin to make everyone feel welcome and at home in Golden by displaying a Black Lives Matter banner on the Welcome to Golden Arch sign.

SarahCarrasco 4 months ago

One of the easiest ways to be a welcoming and inclusive community is not to try and turn somebody else's tragedy into "wholesome entertainment for the whole family." Between 1492 and 1900 the Native American genocide claimed as many as 175 million indigenous lives (https://www.se.edu/native-american/wp-content/uploads/sites/49/2019/09/A-NAS-2017-Proceedings-Smith.pdf). Hunting buffalo to near-extinction was not just a thoughtless waste of a natural resource. Buffalo hunt was the military strategy favored by General Philip Sheridan to starve Native Americans onto the reservations (https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/where-the-buffalo-no-longer-roamed-3067904/). Sheridan wrote about the buffalo hunters, "These men have done more in the last two years, and will do more in the next year, to settle the vexed Indian question, than the entire regular army has done in the last forty years. They are destroying the Indians’ commissary." William Cody ("Buffalo Bill") was an enthusiastic participant in both the buffalo hunts and the wars against the Planes Indians. In later years his Wild West Show retailed the genocide as family entertainment along the lines of dime novels. He even hired Native Americans to reenact old battles in which, of course, "Buffalo Bill" always won. One final humiliation: having to make money by reenacting your people's destruction. While William Cody may have passed through Golden, he had no material connection to our town's history. His expressed desire was to be buried in Wyoming. However, the editors of the "Denver Post" paid Cody's estranged widow to bury him on Lookout Mountain to create a tourist attraction.Now that Buffalo Bill Days is on hiatus due to COVID-19, the time is right to rethink Golden's connection with Cody. Recently, signs saying "REPLACE ME" and "GENOCIDE CLOWN" were placed on and around the Cody statue at 10th and Washington. In a Golden Facebook group numerous angry, white supremacist comments raged against the anonymous sign-makers. One local realtor even went to far as to say that if Hitler had won the Second World War, then we'd be honoring statues of him--as if the goodness or badness of genocide were culturally relative!So it appears that the Cody statue is becoming a rallying point for white supremacists, and it would be a shame if these kind of people infiltrated our summer community celebration.My suggestion is to honor figures more directly connected to our local history such as Mines founder Edward Berthoud who lived at 11th and Washington or White Antelope, a Cheyenne chief who frequented our area, sought peace, and died in the Sand Creek Massacre (https://www.wsj.com/articles/my-great-great-grandfather-and-an-american-indian-tragedy-1416855754). It's time to relocate the Cody statue to the Buffalo Bill Grave and Museum and replace it with an image that doesn't mock others' suffering. It's also time to replace "Buffalo Bill Days" with a celebration that reflects our community's positive values and authentic history.A personal note: My family came to Golden in 1859, and my great, great grandfather was Golden's first town marshal. I have always found corny nostalgia and western cosplay to be utterly more disrespectful to my family history than critiques of William Cody.

simpson.b 4 months ago

How is the city of Golden engaging community leaders in the public and business sectors to encourage diversity and in their hiring and policy-making practices? Equity begins with a seat at the table.

Grace Griego 5 months ago

The real path to racial equity begins with having housing that is affordable for all income levels and jobs that provide living wages.

slimshad 5 months ago

Will the Golden City Council study session with GPD be open to the public in any capacity (ie live-streamed or minutes)? Thanks

Blaise 5 months ago